Drumming and Pinning

Have to keep drumming…


If you like Econesting, you’ll just love the Econesting Facebook page. Where else would you find repurposed drums made from wine barrels?

…and no, I did not contribute to emptying those drums (…maybe just a sip)

You’d rather tweet? Head over to the Econesting Twitter page @econester and say hi.


Have you also discovered my latest obsession? Pinterest!!! I just started a page (will get the button up here soon)…the photos are dreamy. I’m pinning absolutley incredible images on my Pinterest page. Prepare to be hooked.

It would be so nice if you would like/love Econesting on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest.

Almost forgot to mention that signing up for Econesting’s RSS Feed/Newsletter is the best way to get Econesting posts delivered right to your Inbox. Yay! Go to the right side of this page and enter your email address.

Inspiring posts are updated daily by me. And just in case you’re thinking that this is just one big shameless plug…well, ok…BUT I do not make money from Econesting. I don’t sell anything here. It is my pleasure connecting to a community of eco-lovin’ friends. Please keep in touch! xoRonnie

Photo: from Facebook

No Resolutions


As we flip the calendar page to a new year, it’s nice to mark its beginnings in a meaningful way. Each time I sit down to write a New Year’s post, I bump up against what I am beginning to consider a highly overused word, Resolutions. Believe me, I’ve used and abused the “r” word, and its derivative, resolve, many times. In my mind, committing to resolutions seems…well, so 2011ish.

What’s the issue with resolutions? For one, I poked around and have not found any insightful end of the year round-up type articles about whether or not we fulfilled our resolutions from last year.

New Old Resolutions

I did find a lot of lists. This list from Earthshare includes simple rrrrresolutions (see, it’s not even rolling off my tongue comfortably).

Resolve to eat healthier.
Resolve to lose weight and get in shape.
Resolve to spend more quality time with my family and loved ones.
Resolve to manage my money and spend less.
Resolve to give back.

Don’t you think those were some nice New Year resolutions for our pristine new year? I do, but they leave me asking…

Who holds whom accountable for resolutions?

I guess it is the person making the resolutions. That seems like a set up…for failure.

Old New Rulin’s

The second list comes from Woody Guthrie. Yes, you read that right. This land is your land, this land is my land, and this land was made for making rulin’s (as Woody calls ‘em). In 1942, Woody Guthrie penned this list (click here to view list larger):

Wake Up And Fight

To me, Woody’s rulin’s are not resolutions. They are intentions. Number 33: Wake Up And Fight seems like it could have been written today about so many burning issues. The 99%ers are waking up the masses to inequalities in our social financial system. And many of us are waking up to climate change, food safety issues, how we educate our children and how best to protect our environment against polluters.

So, I’m turning away from resolutions that are made and broken, and moving on to intentions that are positive and hopeful. As new agey as this may seem, an intention embodies a feeling of noticing a new purpose. My hope is that my finest intentions will continue to lead to action.

I hold no ill will towards those who make remarkable resolutions. I’m all for a demarcation and promise of a fabulous year ahead with its vast amount of newness and wonder. I’m just dropping the “r” word from my New Year’s vocabulary, and diving into 2012 with intention…and maybe a few rulin’s.

Where will the new year lead you?

Photo Credits: ffffound, Boing Boing

Last Minute Holiday DIY

Did you think I was going to go all Scrooge on you and not extend my deep well of holiday DIY projects this year? Maybe you thought the holiday’s predictability with its earlier and earlier seasonal creep, and obsessive waste had taken over my good will and peace towards the blogosphere? Or, could it be you remember last year’s A-Z Holiday DIY Gift-Guide burnout?

The truth is I’ve been collecting and squirreling away these three project ideas.

One of my greatest pleasures is gift-giving. While I may have ditched the mall and mostly shopped local with some online purchases sprinkled in, the bottom line on the greenest holiday gifts and decorations are still the ones that don’t consume our planet’s resources. They contribute in ways that bring beauty, sustainability and meaning…and they can’t hold a candle to those that roll off assembly the line.

So, you have a choice: grab your keys and make that last mad dash to the mall, or make meaning.

Favorite Hanukkah Project of the Season

Twig Menorah: For a Hanukkah centerpiece, you just can’t go wrong with a twig and a candle…or 8.

Favorite Christmas DIY Project of the Season

Crystal Chandelier Ornament (main image): I have a box of mix-matched crystals that my father-in-law gave me years ago. Just attach Christmas tree hooks to the crystals for a sparkling holiday reuse.

Favorite Food Project of the Season

After teaching young kids…and raising a few, I thought I was over playing with food, but sappiness took over and these Black Olive Penguins (cute, huh?) almost got the better of me. But I’ll spare you such silliness and instead share these Good For You Whoopie Pies. Apparently, I’ve been living under a Whoopie Pie rock because I never had one of these compact morsels of sweet goodness until this past Thanksgiving. My daughter’s college roommate visited and brought pumpkin Whoopie Pies from the Whoopie Pie capital of NY…Brooklyn. Enjoy!

Photo credits: HomeShoppingSpy, Shelterness, Eating Well

Holiday Waste…Holiday Win


Holiday Win: 10 Ways To Reduce Holiday Waste

Fascinating or Bah Humbug?

Infographic via Green Upgrader

Bike Right: 3 Reasons (video)

Ride a bike…

1. Because our children know what’s best for their future.

Greenhouse gases emitted by cars causes climate change, which will affect our children’s and their children’s future.

2. Because car commuting costs an arm and a leg.

The typical American family spends almost $8000 a year to own and operate a car. A decent bike can be had for a few hundred dollars, last for years, and cost almost nothing to operate.

3. Because this is your life.

Pollution from cars causes lung cancer, respiratory problems, smog, and acid rain.

Photo: Paul Newman via Rides A Bike